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Health


Living with allergies. How to manage and reduce symptoms?
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An allergy is an immunological reaction of the body to certain substances that are usually not harmful to most people. These substances are called allergens and can include a variety of items such as pollen, foods, animal hair, dust mites, insect bites, mold and some medications. An allergic reaction occurs when the immune system mistakenly identifies an allergen as a danger and starts producing antibodies, especially immunoglobulin E (IgE). When exposed to an allergen, these antibodies trigger a variety of chemical reactions in the body, including the release of histamine from mast cells and basophils, which are a type of white blood cell.

Hormonal changes during menopause
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Menopause is a natural biological process that marks the period when a woman's menstruation stops and she can no longer conceive naturally. This process occurs due to hormonal changes in the body, especially a decrease in estrogen and progesterone levels. Menopause is officially diagnosed when a woman has not had a period for 12 consecutive months and there are no other obvious reasons for the cessation of periods.

How to reduce the risk of HPV infection?
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Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common virus belonging to the Papillomaviridae family. There are more than 200 types of HPV, which are divided into low-risk and high-risk types. Low-risk HPVs usually cause benign skin or mucosal papillomas, also known as warts, while high-risk HPVs can cause malignant tumors such as cervical, anal, penile, oral cavity, and throat cancers.

How can fiber and its consumption help prevent vascular atherosclerosis?
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Dietary fiber is a complex carbohydrate that is an essential part of a healthy diet. They are divided into two main types: soluble and insoluble fibers.

Soluble fibers, as their name suggests, dissolve in water and form a gel-like substance in the digestive tract. They are found in foods such as oats, beans, apples, citrus fruits, carrots and barley. Soluble fiber helps lower blood cholesterol because it binds to cholesterol molecules and removes them from the body. In addition, they slow down the absorption of glucose, which is useful for regulating blood sugar.

Menopause and vascular atherosclerosis. Are the risks increasing?
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Menopause is a natural biological process that marks the end of a woman's reproductive years. This is the period when a woman's ovaries stop producing eggs, and the levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone drop significantly. Menopause is officially diagnosed when you have stopped menstruating for 12 consecutive months. Menopause usually starts between the ages of 45 and 55, but it can start earlier or later. Menopause consists of three main stages: premenopause, perimenopause and postmenopause.

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